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How To Sync Up Unity Projects

Want to work on the same Unity Project over multiple computers? Even have multiple people work on one project all at once? Well theirs a free easy method that works!

Step 1:
Go to dropbox.com. Make an account and download their soft ware. You have 2GB of space for free! It's not much to expand on that either, but I've yet to run across any space issues.

Step 2:
Open up Unity. Go to file>New Project. Under project location, Browse, and create a new folder under your dropbox folder. Make that where your project lies.

Step 3:
Go share! You can install dropbox at any computer and log in with your account. Your assets will be loaded into the dropbox folder. To open you Unity project from dropbox, simply go to file>open project, then find the folder that contains your unity project and hit open. You can also log into your dropbox account, and send other drop box users an invitation to share your folder, you have to know their email. When they accept their drop box will now contain the projects folder. They just open it the same way.

Limitations:
Of course there is the amount of memory you have, but its not a big fee what so ever to upgrade. 10$ a month allows you to upgrade to 50GB. You need internet connection so the Assets folder can properly update. Updating all modified objects takes a while also, but not to terribly long. If a computer is shut down, while others are working on the project, when you turn it on, you should wait for your dropbox to finnish updating before you open up the Unity Editor. Before you turn off your computer after working on the project. you should wait till your computer is done updating all the assets within the folder before you shut it down.

Any questions or problems? Leave a comment or message me!

Comments

  1. If two people are working on the same script (for example), do the changes each person made to it sync correctly? I guess not...

    ReplyDelete
  2. I'd think you'd have to have one person save the script, then Unity on their computer update, have dropbox update the partner's computer, then unity update it'd assests folder. Two people working on the same script, and when you really think about it same scene, would be kinda difficult. Thank you for the question!

    ReplyDelete
  3. no drop box just keep track about number of files .
    its copy all files from your project .
    it replace you files if same name .
    so keep track about your team who working on which area and file .
    your data might be loss if you guys work on a script , scene , object or texture on very same time .

    ReplyDelete

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