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Making a character model Blender 2.57 Part one

New tutorial on another way on making a character.  For reference, I'll be doing this from right-ortho perspective, which you can switch to by pressing 3 on a numberpad, or if you have an emulated numberpad, the 3 on the number row.

So, you start out with your basic cube, go into edit mode and subdivide it.  Press Z to change it to wireframe mode and select the bottom half and the quarter to the right and delete it.  You should be left with a rectangular prism with a missing bottom and side.  You can fix this by selecting two adjacent edges then pressing F which will join the two edges together with a face, or you can leave it hollow.

The next part is mirroring the object.  Select the object and go to modifiers.  Since I'm doing the object from right-ortho, I will make it so it mirrors on the y axis, and y axis only.  Under options, check merge, clippings, and vertex groups.  This makes sure that the object mirrors correctly and also while you are modeling it doesn't make creases in the middle of the model.

Creating the character is all about knowing how to extrude, loop cut and merge edges.  If you don't know how to do this stuff (you have to be in edit mode);
extrude: select a face, edge, or vertice and press E.  When you've extruded it to the length that you want it, click the left mouse button (LMB)
loop cut: have your cursor over the face you want to add an edge to and hit CTRL R and click the LMB.  The purple line will change to an orange line, of which you can change the placement, when you have the placement you want, click the LMB to set it.

Using these tools will allow you to add more detail to your piece and also make it smoother.  Using this method, I've found that my models have come out better and more appealing,  it is also easier to cooperate with, that is, using a hollow mesh and deleting 3/4 of the cube before mirroring, and also clipping.
Withing the first couple minutes.


I extruded on all sides and joined edges where it was necessary to make the legs


I loop cut on the leg vertically a couple times in order to get the general roundness and once horizontally to show the knee and get the natural bend of the leg.  When I got the general roundness, it still was quite as round as I liked it, so I selected the leg and clicked the smooth vertex option.

At this point, it's starting to look similar to a Magical Melody Character, which that cute stoutness is what I'm aiming for this character.

Change of plans, proportional body.  After I got the general sizings, placements, and such planed out, I selected the whole body and smoothed the vertices some the moved the sides closer together.  

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